Is Your Supply Chain Resilient?

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The major upheavals of the last couple of decades, such as the global recession and the COVID-19 pandemic, have demonstrated that firms will suffer severe setbacks if their supply chains are not resilient. An entire supply chain becomes vulnerable if one component is exposed to risk, just like a house of cards will topple if one section is out of balance.

Supply chain resilience refers to an organization’s ability to use its resources to handle unanticipated supply network disruptions. In other words, it is the ability to respond to and recover from challenges without disrupting operations or deadlines.

Think Beyond Basic Backups to Tackle Ransomware

Although ransomware has long been a serious concern for business owners all over the world, the COVID-19 pandemic has created new opportunities for this threat to flourish, and the attack vector is likely to become even more dangerous in the coming years.

According to a report, 304 million ransomware attacks occurred globally in 2020, with ransomware affecting over 65% of global businesses.1 Experts suggest that this is only the tip of the iceberg. Unfortunately, even though SMBs continue to be disproportionately affected by these nefarious attacks, reporting and notifications rarely make the news.

How to Become a Resilient Organization

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The last year and a half have taught us that the world can experience a tremendous change in a short time. Whether it’s rapid technological advancements, cyberattacks, stalling economies or even a global pandemic, only resilient organizations can weather these storms.

That’s why the concept of organizational resilience is now more relevant than ever before. Organizational resilience is all about how well a company anticipates, plans for and responds to gradual change and unexpected disruptions in its business environment so that it can continue to operate and thrive.

The Role of Compliance in Cybersecurity

The overall technology landscape is evolving at a breakneck pace. While these changes are meant to improve the quality of life, the unfortunate flip side is an increase in cyberthreats. This is why global cybersecurity spending increased from nearly $40 billion in 2019 to $54 billion in 2021.1 Unfortunately, due to a lack of spending on personnel or technology, SMBs are most likely to be targeted by threat actors.

Many organizations fall victim to cybercrime because compliance and security are not a high priority for them. For your organization to run smoothly, both compliance and security are critical. While compliance ensures that your organization stays within the bounds of industry or government laws/regulations, security ensures that your organization’s integrity and vital data are safeguarded.

What to Include in Your Incident Response Plan

Incidence Response Planning

A security incident can topple an organization’s reputation and revenue in a short amount of time. As billionaire Warren Buffet once said, “it takes 20 years to develop a reputation and five minutes to ruin it.” Keeping that in mind, it’s ideal to have an incident response plan in place before a security breach occurs.

An incident response plan is a set of instructions intended to facilitate an organization in detecting, responding to and recovering from network security incidents such as cybercrime, data loss and service disruptions. Having a plan in place contributes to the development of cybersecurity as well as overall organizational resilience.

Cybersecurity: What Every Business Owner Should Know

While organizations and workers have certainly benefitted from the advancement of technology, it has also introduced an unprecedented number of cybersecurity risks. Ransomware attacks, for example, hit businesses every 11 seconds in 2021.1 Therefore, if you want your business to grow and succeed, you must understand the realities of cybersecurity.

All You Need to Know About Least Privilege

In IT, the principle of least privilege (PoLP) refers to the concept that any process, program or user must be provided with only the bare minimum privileges (access or permissions) needed to perform a function. For instance, if a user account has been created for accessing database records, it need not have admin rights. Also, a programmer responsible for updating lines of legacy code can do so without access to the company’s financial records.

Making Ongoing Risk Management an Operational Standard

No business today is 100 percent secure from cyberthreats and more businesses are waking up to this reality now more than ever before. It’s no wonder cybersecurity investment in 2020 is pegged to grow by 5.6 percent to reach nearly $43.1 billion in value.1 With cyberattacks surging due to widespread remote work and increased online interactions during the pandemic, it seems likely that this trend will only continue to grow further.

21 Questions to Determine if Your MSP is Ready for Prime Time or is Setting the Stage for Cybersecurity Problems

As if 2020 wasn’t challenging enough for businesses, reports warn that Managed Service Providers (MSPs), often contracted to provide outsourced IT and cybersecurity services, can represent a significant security risk to the companies they protect. The U.S. Government and cybersecurity firms are sounding the alarm that MSPs represent a significant threat vector for enabling breaches or spreading ransomware to their customers.

The Dangers of the Inbox

Dangers of the Inbox

There’s a greater psychological undercurrent to cyberattacks than you might think. Cybercriminals are hitting their targets by deceiving you and making you act irresponsibly, and in the midst of the Covid chaos, more consistently than ever before. This blog will help you understand how cybercriminals use emails as their weapon of choice, what are the top cyberthreats making their way into your inbox every day, and how you can launch a robust counterattack of your own.