PCI-DSS Compliance: What You Should Know

Over the last year, many organizations struggled to keep their private data secure against cyberthreats as they rushed to adapt to pandemic-inspired shifts in workforce and operations. Cybercrime is becoming increasingly prevalent, and the sophistication and volume of cyberattacks is escalating as well. According to a report, over 300 million ransomware attacks occurred in 2020.1

Dealing with a cybersecurity disaster is difficult and brings forth a lot of uncertainty, especially when it involves financial and reputational damage. This holds true for all organizations, and especially for small and medium-sized businesses (SMBs). SMBs are increasingly becoming prime targets for hackers because they consider these organizations to have insufficient expertise and resources to prevent and respond to attacks.

Prioritize Compliance for Your Business

One of the many challenges you probably face as a business owner is dealing with the vague requirements present in HIPAA and PCI-DSS legislation. Due to the unclear regulatory messaging, “assuming” rather than “knowing” can land your organization in hot water with regulators.

The Health and Human Services (HSS) Office for Civil Rights receives over 1,000 complaints and notifications of HIPAA violations every year.1 When it comes to PCI-DSS, close to 70% of businesses are non-compliant.2 While you might assume it’s okay if your business does not comply with HIPAA or PCI-DSS since many other companies are non-compliant as well, we can assure you it’s not. Keep in mind that being non-compliant puts you and your business at risk of being audited and fined.

Attention, Attention… This is not a Drill!

Recently a major Health Insurance Provider sent out a “Security Due Diligence Questionnaire” to all of its partners and vendors. If you work in the health insurance industry and received this notification, this request may have come to you as quite a shock.

Are IoT devices allowing access to your data?

Does your business use “Smart” TVs, “Smart” Monitoring Systems, or any other type of  Internet of Things (IoT) “Smart” devices? Then be well aware, these devices may be spying on you and stealing your data!