PCI-DSS Compliance: What You Should Know

Over the last year, many organizations struggled to keep their private data secure against cyberthreats as they rushed to adapt to pandemic-inspired shifts in workforce and operations. Cybercrime is becoming increasingly prevalent, and the sophistication and volume of cyberattacks is escalating as well. According to a report, over 300 million ransomware attacks occurred in 2020.1

Dealing with a cybersecurity disaster is difficult and brings forth a lot of uncertainty, especially when it involves financial and reputational damage. This holds true for all organizations, and especially for small and medium-sized businesses (SMBs). SMBs are increasingly becoming prime targets for hackers because they consider these organizations to have insufficient expertise and resources to prevent and respond to attacks.

The Role of Compliance in Cybersecurity

The overall technology landscape is evolving at a breakneck pace. While these changes are meant to improve the quality of life, the unfortunate flip side is an increase in cyberthreats. This is why global cybersecurity spending increased from nearly $40 billion in 2019 to $54 billion in 2021.1 Unfortunately, due to a lack of spending on personnel or technology, SMBs are most likely to be targeted by threat actors.

Many organizations fall victim to cybercrime because compliance and security are not a high priority for them. For your organization to run smoothly, both compliance and security are critical. While compliance ensures that your organization stays within the bounds of industry or government laws/regulations, security ensures that your organization’s integrity and vital data are safeguarded.

Operational and Data Integrity Risks of Internet of Things (IoT) for Small and Medium Businesses (SMBs)

The continued rise in the number of Internet of Things (IoT) connected devices has brought about a host of security challenges for many businesses. As manufacturers compete in a race to bring their IoT devices to market, most fail to include even the most basic security controls necessary to protect the networks these devices connect to or the data they collect or transmit. This leaves businesses of all industries extremely vulnerable to a variety of security risks and cyberthreats.

Prioritize Compliance for Your Business

One of the many challenges you probably face as a business owner is dealing with the vague requirements present in HIPAA and PCI-DSS legislation. Due to the unclear regulatory messaging, “assuming” rather than “knowing” can land your organization in hot water with regulators.

The Health and Human Services (HSS) Office for Civil Rights receives over 1,000 complaints and notifications of HIPAA violations every year.1 When it comes to PCI-DSS, close to 70% of businesses are non-compliant.2 While you might assume it’s okay if your business does not comply with HIPAA or PCI-DSS since many other companies are non-compliant as well, we can assure you it’s not. Keep in mind that being non-compliant puts you and your business at risk of being audited and fined.

4 Data Backup Myths You Need to Know About

Humans generate 2.5 quintillion bytes of data every day.1 That is a substantial amount of information. However, failing to keep up with the ever-changing threat landscape might wipe your share of this data in the blink of an eye. In fact, ransomware has more than doubled in frequency since last year, accounting for 10% of verified breaches.

5 Ways to Combine Compliance & Cybersecurity Best Practices to Improve Outcomes

When you run a business, compliance and security are two essential factors. Both are equally important for the seamless operation of your business. While compliance helps your business stay within the limits of industry or government regulations, security protects the integrity of your business and sensitive data.

It is worth noting that although security is a prime component of compliance, compliance does not equal security. This is because compliance does not consider the growing threat landscape and associated risks. What it considers, however, is a set of pre-defined policies, procedures, controls, etc.

A ‘Compliance First’ Mindset Limits Liabilities for SMBs

By adopting a Compliance First strategy, when choosing solutions and vendors, you will identify those that do not comply with your requirements, eliminate them from your selection process, and then select from the rest. It also means evaluating your current solutions and vendors and replacing those that cannot support your compliance requirements.

Regulations for Securing the Internet of Things

We are living in the era of Digital Transformation and witnessing first-hand the proliferation of assistive technologies such as the Internet of Things (IoT). It is estimated that the global count of IoT devices will reach around 80 billion by 2025 — a figure that will outnumber the human population across the globe tenfold.

This IoT network of physical devices — “things”— designed with embedded sensors, software and other technologies for the purpose of connecting and exchanging data with other devices and systems over the internet, has generated greater access to data and analytics across all industries and can increase the efficiency and agility of business operations.

Why Your Business Needs a Data Security Policy

Today, the competitive business environment is data-driven. Data provides key insights into your customers and business performance that helps you make better decisions and improve processes. However, the sudden influx of employees working remotely exposes your organization’s information to several security threats.

Cybersecurity: What Every Business Owner Should Know

While organizations and workers have certainly benefitted from the advancement of technology, it has also introduced an unprecedented number of cybersecurity risks. Ransomware attacks, for example, hit businesses every 11 seconds in 2021.1 Therefore, if you want your business to grow and succeed, you must understand the realities of cybersecurity.