4 Data Backup Myths You Need to Know About

Humans generate 2.5 quintillion bytes of data every day.1 That is a substantial amount of information. However, failing to keep up with the ever-changing threat landscape might wipe your share of this data in the blink of an eye. In fact, ransomware has more than doubled in frequency since last year, accounting for 10% of verified breaches.

5 Ways to Combine Compliance & Cybersecurity Best Practices to Improve Outcomes

When you run a business, compliance and security are two essential factors. Both are equally important for the seamless operation of your business. While compliance helps your business stay within the limits of industry or government regulations, security protects the integrity of your business and sensitive data.

It is worth noting that although security is a prime component of compliance, compliance does not equal security. This is because compliance does not consider the growing threat landscape and associated risks. What it considers, however, is a set of pre-defined policies, procedures, controls, etc.

A ‘Compliance First’ Mindset Limits Liabilities for SMBs

By adopting a Compliance First strategy, when choosing solutions and vendors, you will identify those that do not comply with your requirements, eliminate them from your selection process, and then select from the rest. It also means evaluating your current solutions and vendors and replacing those that cannot support your compliance requirements.

What to Include in Your Incident Response Plan

Incidence Response Planning

A security incident can topple an organization’s reputation and revenue in a short amount of time. As billionaire Warren Buffet once said, “it takes 20 years to develop a reputation and five minutes to ruin it.” Keeping that in mind, it’s ideal to have an incident response plan in place before a security breach occurs.

An incident response plan is a set of instructions intended to facilitate an organization in detecting, responding to and recovering from network security incidents such as cybercrime, data loss and service disruptions. Having a plan in place contributes to the development of cybersecurity as well as overall organizational resilience.

Regulations for Securing the Internet of Things

We are living in the era of Digital Transformation and witnessing first-hand the proliferation of assistive technologies such as the Internet of Things (IoT). It is estimated that the global count of IoT devices will reach around 80 billion by 2025 — a figure that will outnumber the human population across the globe tenfold.

This IoT network of physical devices — “things”— designed with embedded sensors, software and other technologies for the purpose of connecting and exchanging data with other devices and systems over the internet, has generated greater access to data and analytics across all industries and can increase the efficiency and agility of business operations.

Making Security Awareness Second Nature

Your business’ security program must start with your employees and strong security policies rather than entirely depending on your IT team or the latest security solutions. You can significantly reduce the likelihood of a data breach by combining a well-drafted cybersecurity policy with comprehensive security awareness training.

Why Your Business Needs a Data Security Policy

Today, the competitive business environment is data-driven. Data provides key insights into your customers and business performance that helps you make better decisions and improve processes. However, the sudden influx of employees working remotely exposes your organization’s information to several security threats.

Cybersecurity: What Every Business Owner Should Know

While organizations and workers have certainly benefitted from the advancement of technology, it has also introduced an unprecedented number of cybersecurity risks. Ransomware attacks, for example, hit businesses every 11 seconds in 2021.1 Therefore, if you want your business to grow and succeed, you must understand the realities of cybersecurity.

Wisconsin Act 73 Insurance Data Security

Wisconsin’s new cybersecurity law was signed by Governor Tony Evers on July 15, 2021, and can be found in Wisconsin Statutes Subchapter IX of Chapter 601. The new law is aimed at protecting consumers from increasing risks of cybersecurity threats such as ransomware and data breaches from their insurers and their affiliate agencies. Threat actors remain on the offensive everyday so time is of the essence. Wisconsin insurers should immediately take steps to familiarize themselves with the new legislation and take immediate action to become compliant.

Why You Must Comply With Your Cyber Liability Insurance

If you think that your cyber insurance claim will be cleared with no questions asked, think again. While reviewing your claim, your cyber insurance provider will assess whether you took “due care” to protect your business from being compromised by a cyberattack. While having a cyber liability insurance policy is non-negotiable today, you cannot be fully assured that your insurer will cover any of the costs you incur following a security breach.