What to Include in Your Incident Response Plan

Incidence Response Planning

A security incident can topple an organization’s reputation and revenue in a short amount of time. As billionaire Warren Buffet once said, “it takes 20 years to develop a reputation and five minutes to ruin it.” Keeping that in mind, it’s ideal to have an incident response plan in place before a security breach occurs.

An incident response plan is a set of instructions intended to facilitate an organization in detecting, responding to and recovering from network security incidents such as cybercrime, data loss and service disruptions. Having a plan in place contributes to the development of cybersecurity as well as overall organizational resilience.

Regulations for Securing the Internet of Things

We are living in the era of Digital Transformation and witnessing first-hand the proliferation of assistive technologies such as the Internet of Things (IoT). It is estimated that the global count of IoT devices will reach around 80 billion by 2025 — a figure that will outnumber the human population across the globe tenfold.

This IoT network of physical devices — “things”— designed with embedded sensors, software and other technologies for the purpose of connecting and exchanging data with other devices and systems over the internet, has generated greater access to data and analytics across all industries and can increase the efficiency and agility of business operations.

Making Security Awareness Second Nature

Your business’ security program must start with your employees and strong security policies rather than entirely depending on your IT team or the latest security solutions. You can significantly reduce the likelihood of a data breach by combining a well-drafted cybersecurity policy with comprehensive security awareness training.

Why Your Business Needs a Data Security Policy

Today, the competitive business environment is data-driven. Data provides key insights into your customers and business performance that helps you make better decisions and improve processes. However, the sudden influx of employees working remotely exposes your organization’s information to several security threats.

Cybersecurity: What Every Business Owner Should Know

While organizations and workers have certainly benefitted from the advancement of technology, it has also introduced an unprecedented number of cybersecurity risks. Ransomware attacks, for example, hit businesses every 11 seconds in 2021.1 Therefore, if you want your business to grow and succeed, you must understand the realities of cybersecurity.

Wisconsin Act 73 Insurance Data Security

Wisconsin’s new cybersecurity law was signed by Governor Tony Evers on July 15, 2021, and can be found in Wisconsin Statutes Subchapter IX of Chapter 601. The new law is aimed at protecting consumers from increasing risks of cybersecurity threats such as ransomware and data breaches from their insurers and their affiliate agencies. Threat actors remain on the offensive everyday so time is of the essence. Wisconsin insurers should immediately take steps to familiarize themselves with the new legislation and take immediate action to become compliant.

Why You Must Comply With Your Cyber Liability Insurance

If you think that your cyber insurance claim will be cleared with no questions asked, think again. While reviewing your claim, your cyber insurance provider will assess whether you took “due care” to protect your business from being compromised by a cyberattack. While having a cyber liability insurance policy is non-negotiable today, you cannot be fully assured that your insurer will cover any of the costs you incur following a security breach.

The Beginner’s Guide to Cyber Liability Insurance for Business

The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted everyone in one way or another. If there is one category that most benefited from the pandemic, it’s cybercriminals. That’s why cybercrime has shot up by almost 300% since the start of the pandemic1 and that’s why you must adopt necessary measures to protect your business from malicious cyber players. One of these measures is to have Cyber Liability Insurance (CLI)

Making Hybrid Work Environments Secure

The COVID-19 pandemic caused an unprecedented shift in the way people work. Although most companies relied on a fully remote work model initially, the vaccine rollout has led to the popularization of hybrid work environments. A hybrid work environment has elements of both the traditional on-site work model and the remote work model. Employees can choose to work from home, at the office or a combination of both.

Defense in Depth (DiD): Think Like a Hacker

The current threat landscape is rapidly advancing, with cybercriminals constantly upgrading their toolset to break through security defenses. If you want to outsmart malicious hackers, it’s time to start thinking like them. Fend them off with various layered defense methods. This is what Defense in Depth (DiD) is all about.

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) defines DiD as “The application of multiple countermeasures in a layered or stepwise manner to achieve security objectives. The methodology involves layering heterogeneous security technologies in the common attack vectors to ensure that attacks missed by one technology are caught by another.”